Departmental Advisors
Graduate
JaTara Smith
Departmental Notes

For course descriptions and pre-requisite information click on the subject column next to the appropriate catalog number.

PADMN 6289 - 002 Research Design-P.A.


This course introduces the fundamentals of research design in social research, from developing research questions to selecting and executing data collection and analysis methods. The course assumes a broad view of what constitutes research and scholarly inquiry, covering approaches and methodologies that range from interpretivism to positivist social science. The class emphasizes co-learning and critical dialogue over evaluation and grades. Students will be expected to assume considerable responsibility for their learning, as well as that of their peers. Although the Prof will be present and engaged throughout the class, his role will be more akin to collaborator and facilitator than knowledge provider. The pedagogical underpinnings of this class approach are outlined in Prof Carter’s “Letter on Course Pedagogy & (Un)Grading” (https://bit.ly/3aeuAkf) and the associated “Letter on Social Equity in the Public Administration Classroom (& Beyond)” (https://bit.ly/32pjYeh). Although the class covers a range of research approaches, methodologies, and methods, much of the coursework will revolve around semester-long research projects carried out in small, collaborative research groups. Several “check-ins” will be scheduled throughout the semester for groups to meet with Prof Carter, discuss their progress, and address any challenges. Peer reviews between collaborative research groups will provide further engagement and feedback. Towards the end of class, each group will be encouraged to publish their results in an open-access online volume of “Inquiry of the Public Sort: Microstudies in Public Administration and Public Affairs” (https://pubadminmicrostudies.pressbooks.com/). You can find out more about Prof Carter’s research and teaching on his website https://www.policyandadmin.org/, as well as the Resources Hub of the Medium publication Inquiry of the Public Sort (https://bit.ly/3x0QIbK). Contact him at david.carter@mpa.utah.edu if you have any questions or concerns regarding the course curriculum, content, activities, or internet/technology requirements. The course fee covers all required textbooks and course materials at a reduced cost. Students may request to opt out here: https://portal.verba.io/utah/login

PADMN 6289 - 002 Research Design-P.A.

  • Class Number: 15489
  • Instructor: CARTER, DAVID P
  • Component: Seminar
  • Type: Online
  • Units: 3.0
  • Wait List: No
  • Fees: $44.65
  • Seats Available: 1

This course introduces the fundamentals of research design in social research, from developing research questions to selecting and executing data collection and analysis methods. The course assumes a broad view of what constitutes research and scholarly inquiry, covering approaches and methodologies that range from interpretivism to positivist social science. The class emphasizes co-learning and critical dialogue over evaluation and grades. Students will be expected to assume considerable responsibility for their learning, as well as that of their peers. Although the Prof will be present and engaged throughout the class, his role will be more akin to collaborator and facilitator than knowledge provider. The pedagogical underpinnings of this class approach are outlined in Prof Carter’s “Letter on Course Pedagogy & (Un)Grading” (https://bit.ly/3aeuAkf) and the associated “Letter on Social Equity in the Public Administration Classroom (& Beyond)” (https://bit.ly/32pjYeh). Although the class covers a range of research approaches, methodologies, and methods, much of the coursework will revolve around semester-long research projects carried out in small, collaborative research groups. Several “check-ins” will be scheduled throughout the semester for groups to meet with Prof Carter, discuss their progress, and address any challenges. Peer reviews between collaborative research groups will provide further engagement and feedback. Towards the end of class, each group will be encouraged to publish their results in an open-access online volume of “Inquiry of the Public Sort: Microstudies in Public Administration and Public Affairs” (https://pubadminmicrostudies.pressbooks.com/). You can find out more about Prof Carter’s research and teaching on his website https://www.policyandadmin.org/, as well as the Resources Hub of the Medium publication Inquiry of the Public Sort (https://bit.ly/3x0QIbK). Contact him at david.carter@mpa.utah.edu if you have any questions or concerns regarding the course curriculum, content, activities, or internet/technology requirements. The course fee covers all required textbooks and course materials at a reduced cost. Students may request to opt out here: https://portal.verba.io/utah/login

PADMN 6290 - 090 Applied Quant Methods


This is an online course, which does not have a specific meeting time or location throughout the semester. For additional information, please visit https://online.utah.edu/about-online-learning/

PADMN 6290 - 090 Applied Quant Methods

  • Class Number: 14295
  • Instructor: PACE, LEVI N
  • Component: Seminar
  • Type: Online
  • Units: 3.0
  • Wait List: No
  • Fees: $60.00
  • Seats Available: 19

This is an online course, which does not have a specific meeting time or location throughout the semester. For additional information, please visit https://online.utah.edu/about-online-learning/

PADMN 6300 - 027 Administrative Theory


This course is provided as an entirely online, asynchronous option on Canvas for the Fall 2021 semester. Two other sections of this course are offered in in-person formats, one in compressed, 4-weekend format, the other in weekly 3-hour sessions over 16 weeks. Students in this online section will be able to take the course without needing to meet live (no Zoom sessions) with the instructor and fellow students. In this course, students will need to complete assignments during an 8-week course period, with adequate time provided toward the end of the course to complete the final projects. The 8-week course period is structured as follows: (1) An initial, 2-week period - Aug 23-Sep 5 - for syllabus review and assignment preparation, (2) Four weekly class periods in which reading assignments are completed, group discussions held, and written assignments are submitted, and (3) a two-week period - Oct 3-17 - for completion of final projects. The overall course period runs from August 23rd to October 17th, 2021. Administrative Theory addresses normative and explanatory theories that underpin the field of public administration. It provides a set of theoretical frameworks that help students interpret and understand more about the nature and practice of public administration in the U.S. context. It will also aid students in drawing connections among all the courses in the MPA program. This course is taught from an "historical institutional" perspective, meaning that students will learn about the evolution of American governing institutions and the ideas, theories and practices that undergird them. Administrative theory and practice evolves in this historical-institutional context as a part of the ongoing political discourse about how we should and/or do govern. Much of the framework for our governing system was set in place during our founding era in the late 18th century. That legacy strongly influences how we have governed our society to the current day. Accordingly, students will read at length about Alexander Hamilton, who was the leading administrative thinker and practitioner of his day, and who set in place the framework for the American administrative state. Students will also learn about conflicting administrative ideas and values generated by different founders (such as Jefferson and his Anti-federalist allies) that also remain active and current in administrative practice. This course will also draw students' attention to what has been ignored or marginalized in our thinking about American administrative theory and practice. This attention begins with our Constitution which, despite its claim to represent all people and to protect their rights, nonetheless perpetuated slavery with only oblique references to the obnoxious practice, and confined women to domestic roles with few legal rights independent of their spouses or fathers. From that point on, the administrative institutions of states and nation participated in brutal subjugation of many minorities, depriving them of voting rights, property ownership, and much more until the mid-to-late 20th century. Significant vestiges of this discriminatory system remain in place to this day. A variety of chronologies and brief historical accounts of such discrimination are assigned in parallel with the more conventional readings on the evolution of administrative theory and practice. The course fee covers all required textbooks and course materials at a reduced cost. Students may request to opt out here: https://portal.verba.io/utah/login

PADMN 6300 - 027 Administrative Theory

  • Class Number: 19456
  • Instructor: GREEN, RICHARD T
  • Component: Lecture
  • Type: Online
  • Units: 3.0
  • Requisites: Yes
  • Wait List: No
  • Fees: $73.95
  • Seats Available: 1

This course is provided as an entirely online, asynchronous option on Canvas for the Fall 2021 semester. Two other sections of this course are offered in in-person formats, one in compressed, 4-weekend format, the other in weekly 3-hour sessions over 16 weeks. Students in this online section will be able to take the course without needing to meet live (no Zoom sessions) with the instructor and fellow students. In this course, students will need to complete assignments during an 8-week course period, with adequate time provided toward the end of the course to complete the final projects. The 8-week course period is structured as follows: (1) An initial, 2-week period - Aug 23-Sep 5 - for syllabus review and assignment preparation, (2) Four weekly class periods in which reading assignments are completed, group discussions held, and written assignments are submitted, and (3) a two-week period - Oct 3-17 - for completion of final projects. The overall course period runs from August 23rd to October 17th, 2021. Administrative Theory addresses normative and explanatory theories that underpin the field of public administration. It provides a set of theoretical frameworks that help students interpret and understand more about the nature and practice of public administration in the U.S. context. It will also aid students in drawing connections among all the courses in the MPA program. This course is taught from an "historical institutional" perspective, meaning that students will learn about the evolution of American governing institutions and the ideas, theories and practices that undergird them. Administrative theory and practice evolves in this historical-institutional context as a part of the ongoing political discourse about how we should and/or do govern. Much of the framework for our governing system was set in place during our founding era in the late 18th century. That legacy strongly influences how we have governed our society to the current day. Accordingly, students will read at length about Alexander Hamilton, who was the leading administrative thinker and practitioner of his day, and who set in place the framework for the American administrative state. Students will also learn about conflicting administrative ideas and values generated by different founders (such as Jefferson and his Anti-federalist allies) that also remain active and current in administrative practice. This course will also draw students' attention to what has been ignored or marginalized in our thinking about American administrative theory and practice. This attention begins with our Constitution which, despite its claim to represent all people and to protect their rights, nonetheless perpetuated slavery with only oblique references to the obnoxious practice, and confined women to domestic roles with few legal rights independent of their spouses or fathers. From that point on, the administrative institutions of states and nation participated in brutal subjugation of many minorities, depriving them of voting rights, property ownership, and much more until the mid-to-late 20th century. Significant vestiges of this discriminatory system remain in place to this day. A variety of chronologies and brief historical accounts of such discrimination are assigned in parallel with the more conventional readings on the evolution of administrative theory and practice. The course fee covers all required textbooks and course materials at a reduced cost. Students may request to opt out here: https://portal.verba.io/utah/login

PADMN 6320 - 001 Pub Pol Theor & Ap


This is an online course, which does not have a specific meeting time or location throughout the semester. For additional information, please visit https://online.utah.edu/about-online-learning/ This course introduces the critical examination public policy making in democratic societies, with an emphasis on the United States. The class seeks to bridge theoretical and empirical knowledge: we’ll deepen our understanding of real-world policy making with theoretical logic and we’ll develop deeper theoretical insights by examining real-world policy processes. The class emphasizes co-learning and critical dialogue over evaluation and grades. Students will be expected to assume considerable responsibility for their learning, as well as that of their peers. Although the Prof will be present and engaged throughout the class, his role will be more akin to collaborator and facilitator than knowledge provider. The pedagogical underpinnings of this class approach are outlined in Prof Carter’s “Letter on Course Pedagogy & (Un)Grading” (https://bit.ly/3aeuAkf) and the associated “Letter on Social Equity in the Public Administration Classroom (& Beyond)” (https://bit.ly/32pjYeh). Activities and assignments will be carried out primarily in groups, much of which revolves around a sustained collaborative project in which students investigate a policy topic of their choosing throughout the semester. Towards the end of the course, students will be encouraged to publish their insights on the course blog Policy Process Matters (https://bit.ly/3wZBm7n). Students will also engage in ongoing asynchronous online exchanges via social-media/communication apps. As such, class participation will require access to high-speed internet and an appropriate smart phone and/or computer (University assistance with such matters is available). You can find out more about Prof Carter’s research and teaching on his website https://www.policyandadmin.org/, as well as the Resources Hub of the Medium publication Inquiry of the Public Sort (https://bit.ly/3x0QIbK). Contact him at david.carter@mpa.utah.edu if you have any questions or concerns regarding the course curriculum, content, activities, or internet/technology requirements.

PADMN 6320 - 001 Pub Pol Theor & Ap

  • Class Number: 5717
  • Instructor: CARTER, DAVID P
  • Component: Lecture
  • Type: Online
  • Units: 3.0
  • Requisites: Yes
  • Wait List: No
  • Seats Available: -1

This is an online course, which does not have a specific meeting time or location throughout the semester. For additional information, please visit https://online.utah.edu/about-online-learning/ This course introduces the critical examination public policy making in democratic societies, with an emphasis on the United States. The class seeks to bridge theoretical and empirical knowledge: we’ll deepen our understanding of real-world policy making with theoretical logic and we’ll develop deeper theoretical insights by examining real-world policy processes. The class emphasizes co-learning and critical dialogue over evaluation and grades. Students will be expected to assume considerable responsibility for their learning, as well as that of their peers. Although the Prof will be present and engaged throughout the class, his role will be more akin to collaborator and facilitator than knowledge provider. The pedagogical underpinnings of this class approach are outlined in Prof Carter’s “Letter on Course Pedagogy & (Un)Grading” (https://bit.ly/3aeuAkf) and the associated “Letter on Social Equity in the Public Administration Classroom (& Beyond)” (https://bit.ly/32pjYeh). Activities and assignments will be carried out primarily in groups, much of which revolves around a sustained collaborative project in which students investigate a policy topic of their choosing throughout the semester. Towards the end of the course, students will be encouraged to publish their insights on the course blog Policy Process Matters (https://bit.ly/3wZBm7n). Students will also engage in ongoing asynchronous online exchanges via social-media/communication apps. As such, class participation will require access to high-speed internet and an appropriate smart phone and/or computer (University assistance with such matters is available). You can find out more about Prof Carter’s research and teaching on his website https://www.policyandadmin.org/, as well as the Resources Hub of the Medium publication Inquiry of the Public Sort (https://bit.ly/3x0QIbK). Contact him at david.carter@mpa.utah.edu if you have any questions or concerns regarding the course curriculum, content, activities, or internet/technology requirements.

PADMN 6550 - 001 Nonprofit & NGOs

PADMN 6550 - 001 Nonprofit & NGOs

  • Class Number: 6276
  • Instructor: VALERO ENRIQUEZ, JESUS N
  • Component: Lecture
  • Type: Online
  • Units: 3.0
  • Wait List: No
  • Seats Available: 2

PADMN 6870 - 001 Sem-Public Admin Ethics

PADMN 6870 - 001 Sem-Public Admin Ethics

  • Class Number: 5718
  • Instructor: SVEDIN, LINA
  • Component: Seminar
  • Type: Online
  • Units: 3.0
  • Requisites: Yes
  • Wait List: No
  • Seats Available: 9